Cost of Equipment

When buying home gym equipment you generally get what you pay for – robust equipment that will provide years of reliable use can't be manufactured cheaply.

If your budget is really limited, then look for inexpensive options such as a skipping rope, resistance bands, or an exercise mat. Another great option is used equipment. Many people buy equipment, don’t use it, then sell it. If you are buying used, be sure to test equipment first, or purchase from a dealer who can give you some kind of guarantee.
 

There are bargains available, but consider some of the reasons equipment might be cheap. These can include:

  • It could be a discontinued model – if so, are parts still available.
  • A new, updated model has just come out.
  • It's cheaply made or low quality.


Size and space:

An item that looks small in a large showroom can be enormous when you try and fit it in your house. Always measure both the space you have available, and the size of any equipment you are considering buying.

    • Be aware of your ceiling height - low ceilings can easily be hit if lifting weights.
       
    • Weights can be very heavy – it’s best to use them downstairs.
       
    • Beware electrical cables from machines – where are your sockets?
       
    • You’ll also want extra sockets for music or a fan when you’re working out
       
    • Plan for at least as much open space as equipment space.
    Use the following guidelines to determine how much room you'll need:
    • BIKES 10 SQ FEET
    • TREADMILL 25 SQ. FEET
    • ROWERS 15 SQ. FEET
    • FREE WEIGHTS 35 SQ. FEET
    • RESISTANCE BANDS 12 SQ. FEET
    • SKI MACHINE 20 SQ. FEET
    • CLIMBER / STEPPER 15 SQ. FEET
    • WEIGHTS MACHINE 25 SQ. FEET
    • MULTI STATION 50+ SQ. FEET

    The final page with give you a very simple print out chart so you can see which gym equipment is best for you to buy.
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